Lime/Limoncello

About a month ago, I started a cross between a lime and lemon liqueur. Today, I found a moment to strain it off the pulp and sample. Yum. All the delicious sweetness and bitterness of a good limoncello, with some added complexity from the lime. It does have a rather muddled color, rather than the fresh lemon yellow of a pure limoncello. I shall endure.

Lemon-Lime Goodness

Unauthorized Phone Access

My eldest and youngest must have gotten a hold of my phone since taking the photos of books and massive fallen tree. A small sample of the numerous (most of ridiculously poor quality) photos taken:

Awww, they’re so adorable!

One Afternoon In May

As I finished my last call of the workday, the power went in and out a couple times in quick succession. Then, it stayed out (it is back on now, surprisingly). It has been very windy, so I went outside to see if something had caused any damage to the house.

First, I found a package from Michael Aubrey on my doorstep:

A History of Ancient Greek

All arrived in good condition! Michael and his wife, Rachel, are in the process of some big changes, so he was looking at whittling down some of his book weight. I jumped at the chance to “help”. From his blog:

For ourselves (Michael and Rachel Aubrey), we are currently transitioning to serve with Wycliffe Bible Translators. We have been offered a ministry assignment creating digital Greek & Hebrew tools and resources, grounded in contemporary linguistics for advancing bible translation, resources that integrate corpus linguistics and the digital humanities for the benefit of minority Bible translation. Because our assignment with Wycliffe is directly connected to the purpose of Koine-Greek.com, we hope that transition will also mean more opportunity for regular writing about Ancient Greek linguistics here based on our work with Wycliffe, along side the continued work on our Comprehensive Grammar of Hellenistic and Early Roman Greek.

https://koine-greek.com/2019/06/06/from-the-editors-transitions/

You might consider helping them out with support, if you find the work they are planning to engage in worthwhile…

Setting my new-to-me books to the side to continue problem solving on the power, I found my neighbor in shock (I was soon to follow) at the size of the tree the wind had knocked down just up the road from us:

Crash!

Luckily, not a bit of damage to the house, and as I mentioned, power is even back on now. I did end up missing our church’s prayer time on zoom. Little bummed at that. But glad to be back on the grid earlier than I thought I might be!

In The Mail: Lexical Semantics

I spend (likely) too much time over at Nerdy Language Majors. Between that and Koine-Greek, I always have something new and interesting to learn and grapple with. And sometimes, it is useful just to find books worth picking up. So, HT to Keith Surland for pointing out Lexical Semantics of the Greek New Testament, by Nida & Louw, a week or so back. I look forward to spending time in it soon!

Lexical Semantics of the Greek New Testament

In The Mail: T4G

I picked up a short list of books from T4G’s online store a week or so back. I may not have been able to attend, but I think I am well supplied for the moment!

Plenty to read for the remainder of lockdown, and beyond!

I already have the other volume from Murray & Murray, “Reset”, which I haven’t gotten to. I was a little choose-y on the 9Marks series. I chose ones I thought would be more helpful as an elder and helping the body work towards meaningful membership in the near future; and also some I thought would help stretch me in areas I need stretching.

Batch 85: It’s Been Awhile, Mead

I have not started anything, to my dismay, in many moons. Five, to be exact. So, today, I made it a mission to start something. Beer is likely on the way soon. I’m thinking a nice pale ale or maibock. An orange blossom braggot is on my mind, as well. But I have no time for that today. Today, we made mead.

Looking over ingredients on hand, I decided on a metheglin, that is, a “spiced” mead. And in this case, that means honey, cloves and lemon balm. The cloves we just always have on hand in the spice cabinet. The lemon verbena in the garden is just loving the weather, so we have plenty of it as well.

As for honey, I had a couple gallons of orange blossom, and a gallon of tupelo honey. But I’m saving them for other things (the braggot being one). I went with a gallon of wildflower. Basic, but I’m hoping the lemon balm and clove take center stage!

Mead making is simple, really. I’ve just been a bit lazy. I mean , it can be be complicated, just depends on what your end goal is! At the end of the process – more moons – I’ll perhaps post the recipe for this one. But I am looking forward to it. The lemon verbena Kim helped me pick smelled amazing!

Lalvin-D47, do your thing!

In the Mail: William’s Hebrew Syntax

The fine people of Amazon dropped off this delightful package this morning. I’ve been focusing primarily on Classical Greek (and Latin, French, German and a smidge of Korean and Modern Greek) at the moment, but soon…

Williams’ Hebrew Syntax, 3rd Edition

Miele

My wife took a pretty decent picture of me with our new/used macchina, a 2016 Fiat 500X:

ooooooh… shiny and pretty…

I believe we ended on Miele as her name, honey. You can’t tell in the photo, really, but the golden-yellow sparkles, and also shifts shade ever so slightly depending on the lighting.